Tag Archive | Modern

Pico Size, Mega Quality

How do you say "Oh! Crap" in Hebrew? 3mm IDF Centurians and M3 Halftracks with Navwar 1/300 Su-7

Last year I picked up some 3mm artillery and 23mm AA guns for use as ground targets in my CY6! – Jet Age games.  My aircraft models are 1:300 / 1:285 / 6mm, so I decided to go with 3mm to get that “stuff down there below us” scale effect.  I had heard good stuff about the Oddzial Osmy stuff from Poland and the pictures on the website at PicoArmor certainly looked good, so I ordered up a few.  They definitely looked great and so recently picked up some more stuff  (painting half on commission for Scott even payed for the order).  This time I got a variety of tanks, soft skins, APCs, and infantry. Read More…

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Ambushing the Bear – Check Your 6! Jet Age

Recently I got a scenario from Scott at Skirmish Campaigns to playtest for the upcoming Arab-Israeli scenario book for Check Your 6! – Jet Age.    So I hopped up to the FLGS to put on the game.  The scenario is set in 1970 during the War of Attrition and features a clash between the Israeli Air Force and a elements of a Soviet air regiment.

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My Games for Fall In! 2010

With the move to Winchester, I am now much closer to the sites of the HMGS Big Three gaming conventions and so was able to make it up to Fall In! this year.  I hosted two games this year and I guess the theme for the two was ‘Broken Alliances’ as each featured former allies now trying to do in the other.

My first game was a Check Your 6! – Jet Age game set during the brief conflict between Libya and Egypt during 1977.  In the scenario the Libyans are attempting to destroy some Egyptian artillery positions and send in a strike package of 4 Mirage V fighter-bombers escorted by 4 MiG-23s.  The Egyptians respond by scrambling a flight of 4 MiG-21 to the area.    The  Egyptians on one side of the table largely ignored the strike fighters and went after the MiG escorts, while the other pair of EAF MiGs went after the bombers on their side.  One Mirage went down on the way in and a one of the others failed a test and panicked upon receiving ground fire and was forced to climb up above the AAA.  The remaining Mirage on the north side of the table was forced to go defensive and eventually bombed an empty bit of desert in order to lighten the aircraft and go on the offensive with hi twin 30mm cannon.

Meanwhile the MiG-21s had managed to turn the fight to their favor by getting in tight with the Libyan escort.  This allowed the MiGs to make the most of their more maneuverable aircraft and their better pilots.  A couple of the MiG-23s were lost, which unfortunately for the LARAF, included both of their skilled pilots and their payload of more advanced AA-2D Atoll missiles.  The Libyans continued to scrap, destroying one of gun batteries with a 30mm strafing run and downing one of the MiG-21s, but evetually they had a couple of more planes limping along with engine damage.

At the end of the night the Egyptian air force had won a handy victory, destroying 4-5 aircraft and damaging a couple of others at a cost of 1 aircraft down and one artillery battery destroyed.

It was nice to see the Egyptians get a win in the scenario as the LARAF had won the last two games – one at BrianCon and a second at a recent game I did at the FLGS.  Everyone had a great time and the CY6! line of games continues to impress with it’s ability to take a complex subject and make an intuitive and playable game with great feel.  The set up with the 3D altitude stands, missiles, and nice sized 1/300 planes also drew a lot of raves and I think it looked really good.

The second game I hosted was a repeat of one of my games from last Fall In!, the Roman Seas scenario featuring a clash ebtween naval elements of the former allies Pompey and Caesar.   The game was at 8 AM on Saturday morning and so I was worried about having enough players, but ended up with 6 guys, which was enough to play the scenario comfortably.

Caesar’s captains set up first, with their forces somewhat concentrated to the north and one squadron more to the south.  Pompey’s forces deployed in kind to meet them.  As the two groups closed, Pompey’s ships got the upper hand and were able to race in to engage the less numerous escorts of Caesar and tie them up with boarding actions.  In the center, Caesar’s flag ship accelerated to ram speed and attempted an oar rake of one of Pompey’s ships – unfortunately, the crew on Pompey’s ship was quicker to pull in their oars and Caesar’s ship lost a bunch of oars and was force to drift at max speed!  That took their largest ship out of the battle for a while.

In the north, on of Pompey’s quadremes raced forward and grappled one of the supply ships.   One of the escorting triremes raced in and delivered a crushing ram attack that came within inches of wrecking the quadreme.  Caesar’s men fired several rounds of artillery fire at the ship hoping to take down the last few hull points, but were not able to connect and the heavy Roman marines on board eventually swarmed aboard the trireme, swept her decks and transferred their entire ship’s compliment to the trireme.  That same Roman player later inflicted a second crushing hit and completely wrecked another Roman ship.

However, despite these gains and some success in the far south in sweeping away the marines aboard one of Pompey’s ships, the fleet had gotten bogged down and Pompey’s men were able to keep most of the enemy ships grappled.  One of Pompey’s quadremes had mounted a combat tower  and that ship fought against several of Caesar’s ships at once and managed to grind away all of their combat strength.  Caesar’s ships resorted to trying to force a passage through the shoals around one of the islands to squeeze through, but grounded the ship each time.

Caesar’s flagship eventually came back around and entered the fray in the south, but it was a case of too little, too late as the escort proved unable to free up and of the merchants to make a break for the coast.  In the end their were several ships drifting as derelicts with no crew remaining aboard and Pompey had seized several of the merchants and at least one of Caesar’s warships.  The players mostly seemed to have a great time, except for one gentleman who said the level of detail was just not his cup of tea… fair enough.

As before, the ships draw a lot of attention as they look really fabulous when fully crewed up with marines, ballista, etc.    Unfortunately, I stayed pretty busy with helping to move the game along and mostly forgot to take any pictures (doh!).  I’m inspired now to move on to my next Roman Seas scenario project, which will features one of Pompey’s fleets against a flotilla of pirate ships – lots of little small nimble ships against a few lumbering brutes loaded down with Roman heavy marines.  My main issue with this has been trying to scrounge up any reliable information about the composition of the various pirate fleets that plagued Rome.

Dogfight over the Golan Heights – CY6! Jet Age

Recently Scott Fisher, author of Check Your 6!, offered me and the guys in the group here a chance to preview/playtest the CY6! – Jet Age rules, set for release this summer at Historicon.  I had gotten to play in a couple of games at Historicon and liked it a lot, so jumped at this chance  to explore the game more thoroughly and perhaps provide Scott with a little feedback.

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Scenario Gold!

A recent post on the forums at The Miniatures Page pointed me to the Digitized Monograph Collection held by the Donovon Research Library at the US Army’s Infantry School on Ft. Benning.  This is a great collection of personal accounts and other papers written by US Army officers.  These include WWI through the present.  I’ve so far only explored the WWII section, but that includes accounts at many levels from platoon up through corp as well as specific tactical problems, campaign synopsis, etc.  Many of the monographs I’ve quickly looked at contain maps and should provide a great resource for writing interesting wargame scenarios.

Note that I (and others from what I saw on the TMP forum) had to allow a security exemption for their browser to gain access.